Armstrong Law, P.C.

child custody Archives

What to do about a difficult coparent

When parents in Massachusetts get a divorce, they may still be linked for years by their children. If one parent is narcissistic and manipulative, this relationship can be very difficult. Parents need to find a way to be reliable for their children and not let the other parent's behavior get to them.

How to request a child custody modification

During divorce proceedings for parents in Massachusetts, a judge typically makes a decision regarding child custody. However, if at some point after the divorce is final one or both of the parents want to change the decision, they need to go through the proper channels to request a modification.

The different types of custody arrangement to consider

When filing for custody of a child in Massachusetts, many parents become so caught up in the general tasks that they forget the specifics. According to Mass.gov, parents need to consider the differences between legal and physical child custody. They also need to understand parenting time arrangements and the four custody types allowed in the state.

The difficulties of securing parental rights for LGBTQ couples

When the Obama administration helped to make marriage possible for the LGBTQ community, it was a bittersweet moment. It brought them one step closer to having rights similar to heterosexual couples, but not exactly. One of the biggest outstanding issues was establishing parental rights for both parents when they started a family. This was tricky even when one spouse gave birth to the child and the other spouse was the biological donor.

Relatives can protect children by filing for guardianship

When heartbreaking stories of families torn apart by substance abuse, incarceration, immigration and untimely deaths make the news in Massachusetts, the silver lining is that aunt, grandparent, older sibling or even a friend who stepped forward to take care of the children. These children often become attached to their informal guardians. Some may not have a relationship with their biological parents at all.

Tips for fathers who want joint or sole custody

A heavily contested Massachusetts divorce can be emotionally draining for everyone involved. This is especially true if each parent wants full custody of their children. At Armstrong Law, P.C., we have experience representing clients in the areas of visitation and child custody and finding a positive solution.

Domestic violence and child custody decisions

When there is domestic violence in the household, there can be lasting negative effects on the children. When processing a divorce in Massachusetts and figuring out child custody, the courts will look closely at any abuse report and take into consideration what is in the best interest of the child. When abuse is a factor in the decision-making process, the courts may grant supervised visitation to the accused abuser in order to keep both the child and ex-spouse safe.

How to deal with your first holiday season without the children

Divorced parents in Massachusetts may be dealing with a number of issues around the holidays, and if it is your first holiday without your children, you may be dreading it. Whether you are newly divorced or your kids are spending the holiday with your ex-spouse, you are probably struggling with a variety of emotions. There are a number of tips that may help you get through the holiday smoothly.

How to handle the holidays and child custody

The holidays quickly approaching, and for many people in Massachusetts this is a festive time filled with friends and family. Unfortunately, for many divorced parents this is a time of the year that can be challenging, stressful and depressing. To keep conflicts to a minimum, you and your ex-spouse should discuss the holidays far in advance and make plans that work with everyone's schedules and are fair to the children. This will help ease some of the stress when the holidays do arrive.

Grounds for modifying custody in Massachusetts

Like all states, Massachusetts law provides for modifications to custody orders. However, a parent cannot obtain a modification merely because he or she does not like the current order. The state is very deliberate in how it assigns custody the first time around. If one or both parties to an agreement feels as if an arrangement is not working, they must show how it is not working and why the shortfall negatively impacts the child.

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